Project Management

Using EVM with Microsoft Project Server

Earned Value is a measure of work performed. Techniques for measuring work performed are selected during project planning and are the basis for performance measurement during project execution and control.

 

Often in my career as a Project Manager, I have used Earned Value Measurement by utilizing Microsoft Project Server. It has all the fields you need to accurately report on the Earned Value of a project. As I have said in previous posts, I have my team members not only update their expended time each day but also the remaining work. Microsoft Project can do all the work to adjust the schedule and tell you where your new critical path is. This gives you time to make adjustments to the project before it gets any worse.

 

The performance of separate and distinct work effort that is related to the completion of specific and tangible end products or services, and which can be directly planned and measured, is called discrete effort. In comparison, effort applied to project work that is not readily divisible into discrete efforts for that work, but which is related in direct proportion to measurable discrete work efforts, is called apportioned effort, and support-type activity that does not produce definitive end products is referred to as level of effort.

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October 2, 2008 - Posted by | earned value | ,

4 Comments »

  1. Donna…I love your site and have added it to my favorites.

    I am trying to figure out how to “connect” an apportioned effort task in MS Project to the discrete effort task from which the AE task will derive its earned value. Are you aware of a way to have the % work complete for the AE task to automatically be updated based upon the % work complete for the DE task? I know how to do this manually, but it would be nice to estanlish this type of dependency so that you don’t forget the nature of the relationship.

    Thanks.

    Comment by Tom Brewer, PMP | July 10, 2009 | Reply

    • I don’t know of an automatic way to do that in MS Project, but you should ask Microsoft and let us all know!

      Comment by Donna Ritter | July 10, 2009 | Reply

  2. If I find out I will let you all know.

    Comment by Tom Brewer, PMP | July 10, 2009 | Reply

  3. Microsoft Project Server is awesome…

    Comment by John | February 2, 2010 | Reply


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